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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to hillary clinton with a ringing endorsement. you'll want to see this video. michael tomasky on whether hillary clinton will make a run for the white house. share your thoughts on facebook and on twitter. we're coming right back. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." thanks for watching tonight. republicans are doing a lot of maneuvering on the fiscal cliff. president obama and the democrats have put forward a plan relying mostly on raising more revenue from the wealthiest 2% of the country. republicans rely mostly on cuts affecting the middle class and the poor and republicans aren't specific about how they get $800 billion in revenue. for the conversation, let's turn to richard wolffe, msnbc political analyst and vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. and molly ball, political reporter for "the atlantic." the republican proposal includes ryan's voucher program for medicare. we're not even a month away from the election and they are throwing up on the wall everything that was rejected. why are they doing this? >> well, i can tell you why they think they have a mandate. they a
clinton. >> -- i'll ask michael if this was the first campaign video for decision 2016. >> good to have you with us, folks. thanks for watching. john boehner is hanging on to their ideological hats. the latest attempt to change the conversation is a plan the american people rejected a month ago. the republican counteroffer to the white house plan relies on $800 billion. the plan does not raise any tax rates on the top income earners. it also contains $600 billion in health care cuts. who has been for that? nobody. there are $300 billion in cuts in mandatory government programs and another $300 billion in cuts to agency budgets and discretionary spending. the speaker's office sent a letter outlining the plan saying new revenue would be generated through pro-growth tax reform that closes special interest loopholes and deductions while lowering rates. oh boy. it's the mitt romney plan again. the offer letter actually described the proposal as the bowles plan. republicans say the plan is based on the outline for the debt commission co-chair. the approach outlined in the letter speaker boehn
forgets that president clinton raised taxes on the wealthy and created 22 million jobs. president bush cut taxes on the wealthy and created 1 million jobs. so his economic expertise is a little behind here. but the truth of the matter is, everybody voted in this election, the president said he would raise taxes on people earning over $250,000. that's what he's going to do. that's what's going to happen. he has the authority of an election behind him. running for office is a difficult thing to do, and the people that win the elections have a lot more moral authority than in a democracy than people who talk about elections. >> ryan, that does seem to be the point. republicans may not like it, but that wasn't what this election said american people want. the majority of them. >> i think it's certainly true you have a large number of americans, 60%, according to a "washington post" abc news poll who favor raising taxes on folks earning more than $250,000 a year. but there are a couple other things to keep in mind, as well. president obama often talks about returning to clinton era tax rates.
that rate to 39.6% where it was during the clinton administration. what else is in this new gop proposal? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raising the eligibility age, means testing, things like that. so then we have about $600 billion in essentially spending cuts, half from mandatory spending, half from discretionary spending. this is the other very interesting thing that's new. $200 billion from revising the consumer price index. that sounds very technical. but it has very real world consequences because it very much could affect the money, the checks that social security recipients in particular get every single month because it effectively changes inflation so it changes the formula from what they would get. >> significant differences between the white house proposal on this part of the equatio
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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